This weekend at GLC we're looking at Philippians 3. This passage is foundational at understanding how we are Righteous before God.  Where do we find our "okay-ness" with God, and, it follows, . . with others?  Paul argues against finding righteousness in religious pedigree, or ethnic separation.  But, the whole passage begs the question: "Where do you find your righteousness?".  

Today, our culture is filled with functional saviors.  These are things we place on the highest shelf in our life to define us, define our existence, and help us deal with disappointment in our life (see last post). That's what we do.  . . . we make idols, because we don't trust that God will be enough for us, or we don't appreciate the places and boundaries God has put around our life currently.  So, what do we do?  We look for another savior (low caps on purpose).  

Some of the saviors that loom large on our radar screen these days are; gender, sexuality, greed, and lust.  Each one deserves a blog, but for now,  we see that Paul calls us to "count all as loss" and run to Christ, who is our Savior (caps on purpose). The more we seek a righteousness "of our own", as Paul says, the more we are running away from Christ, the more life gets heavy, and the more we will go unsatisfied.   

Let's count all other saviors as "loss" in order that we gain Christ, his righteousness, our "okay-ness", and Peace; with God and each other.  

 Philippians 3:2-11

 Look out for the dogs, look out for the evildoers, look out for those who mutilate the flesh.  For we are the circumcision, who worship by the Spirit of God and glory in Christ Jesus and put no confidence in the flesh—  though I myself have reason for confidence in the flesh also. If anyone else thinks he has reason for confidence in the flesh, I have more: circumcised on the eighth day, of the people of Israel, of the tribe of Benjamin, a Hebrew of Hebrews; as to the law, a Pharisee;  as to zeal, a persecutor of the church; as to righteousness under the law, blameless.  But whatever gain I had, I counted as loss for the sake of Christ.  Indeed, I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord. For his sake I have suffered the loss of all things and count them as rubbish, in order that I may gain Christ  and be found in him, not having a righteousness of my own that comes from the law, but that which comes through faith in Christ, the righteousness from God that depends on faith—  that I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death, 11 that by any means possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.

Comment